Jewish Studies Events

Upcoming Events

Events Archive

            

Ongoing Events

Hebrew Language Table, February 8, 2016–May 20, 2016
Kline, President's Room  1:30 pm – 2:30 pm


Hebrew Language Table, September 5, 2016–December 22, 2016
Kline, President's Room  1:30 pm – 2:30 pm


Hebrew Language Table, February 6, 2017–May 15, 2017
Kline Commons  6:30 pm – 7:30 pm


2013

Tuesday, November 19, 2013
"The Movement Beyond Marriage Equality" Gabriel Blau: Executive Director of the Family Equality Council
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Gabriel Blau, who graduated from Bard in 2002, now serves as the executive director of the Family Equality Council. Join us as he speaks about his journey as an LGBT activist, which started at Bard College.

Sponsored by: Difference and Media Project; Religion Program; Student Activities
Brian Mateo  845-758-7098  bmateo@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 29, 2013

"From the Shtetl to the Lecture Hall: Jewish Women in 19th Century Europe"

A Lecture by Luise Hirsch

Campus Center, Weis Cinema  5:00 pm
When Europe’s graduate schools began to open their doors to female students in the second half of the 19th century, they were primarily responding to the requests of Jewish women from Russia. Often family breadwinners encouraged to be independent and assertive, they more than other women fought their way into the hitherto exclusively male world of academia. Banned from universities at home, they made Swiss graduate schools the first institutions in the world to train female professionals.

Luise Hirsch was educated at the University of Heidelberg and at Freie Universität Berlin and earned a doctorate in Jewish History from the University of Duisburg in 2005. She lives in Heidelberg and Berlin and works as an author and translator.


Sponsored by: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program
Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7543  kuznitz@bard.edu
  Thursday, October 17, 2013
James Clarke Chace Memorial Speaker Series
Deconstructing Holocaust Denial: how science and history are distorted to promote hate
BGIA, 36 West 44th Street, #1011; New York, NY 10036  6:15 pm – 7:45 pm
Kenneth Stern '75 

Director on Antisemitism, Hate studies and Extremism, American Jewish Committee;  author of numerous books, most recently Antisemitism Today: How It Is the Same, How It Is Different and How to Fight It 


Sponsored by: BGIA; Center for Civic Engagement
Jonathan Cristol  646-839-9262  cristol@bard.edu
Thursday, September 19, 2013
Racist Killings, Mourning Songs,
and a 13-Year Old Girl
Reading and Discussion (in English)
With Eminent German-Jewish Writer Esther Dischereit

Olin, Room 204  7:00 pm
The German Studies Program is pleased to welcome 
Esther Dischereit

Esther Dischereit is one of the most exciting writers and thought-provoking public intellectuals in Germany today. Her poems, novels, essays, plays, including radio plays, her opera libretti and sound installations offer unique insights into the Jewish life of contemporary Europe. She collaborates with composers and musicians and founded the avant-garde project “WordMusicSpace/Sound-Concepts.” Coming from a survivors’ family, commemoration (of the Holocaust) has been a constant reference point in her work. Dischereit’s writings also reflect on what it means to be a woman and an intellectual. The Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia on Jewish Women calls her an “outstanding writer” among Jewish artists in the twenty-first century. For more information, including bibliography, see: http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/dischereit-esther 

Recently, a series of racist killings, committed by the so-called "National Socialist Underground" (NSU) organization, has shocked the German public. Dischereit can be regarded as the most important independent voice covering the legal and political investigations of this unprecedented crime in post-war Germany. While the media focused pre-dominantly on the killers, Dischereit writes on for the victims, their families and friends, and started initiatives on their behalf. She addresses society’s responsibility that is, our common task not to look away. She challenges widespread racism and xenophobia wherever it arises, including the high ranks of the police and secret service. Dischereit has commented on the topic on television, radio, and in prominent newspapers. As an artist she responded with an amazing collection of “Mourning Songs,” which eventually will evolve into an opera – songs of lament, and songs of accusation.  

Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; German Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Jewish Studies Program
Thomas Wild  845-758-7363  twild@bard.edu
  Saturday, April 27, 2013
Music in the Holocaust, Jewish Identity and Cosmopolitanism
Part Three: Kurt Weill and the Modernist Migration: Music of Weill and Other Emigres
Olin Hall  7:00 pm
The Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College is presenting a special series of concerts titled, “Music in the Holocaust, Jewish Identity and Cosmopolitanism,” featuring music composed and performed by Jewish prisoners in Nazi territories during World War II. Three concerts will feature an introduction by a noted scholar in the field placing the music within the context of the larger social, historical and political background out of which it developed.

These events are made possible through the generosity of a grant from the Bertha Effron Fund of the Community Foundation of the Hudson Valley. 

The third concert on Saturday, April 27, “Kurt Weill and the Modernist Migration: Music of Weill and Other Emigres” will focus on the work of Weill and his contribution to the American Songbook, as well as the reverberations of the Weimar cultural legacy in the United States. Weill was a resident of the Hudson Valley during his last decade and was an important figure in the German-Jewish exile community that took root in New York and Hollywood. The evening will feature songs from several of Weill’s American musicals including “Knickerbocker Holiday” (set in the colonial Dutch Hudson Valley) and the 1941 musical “Lady in the Dark,” as well as several of Weill’s works from his collaboration with Brecht. The lecture will touch upon the legacy of the Weimar Republic, the setting in which Weill’s collaboration with Bertolt Brecht took place, and its role in creating a culture that diverged from both the universalizing humanist and romantic nationalist strains of German cultural identity.

This event is free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations are needed.

Sponsored by: Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Music Program
Bridget Hollenback  bhollenb@bard.edu

Press Release: View

Monday, April 15, 2013
Etgar Keret at Bard: In Conversation
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:00 pm

4:00-4:45 pm
Jewish Stories and Israeli Culture Today
4:45-5:30 pm
Writing and Film Making: Creativity and Play
6:30 pm
Keret reads from his work, followed by Q&A
Etgar Keret is one of the most popular and influential writers in Israel today. Keret's work has been published in twenty-two languages and adapted in over forty films. His directorial debut, Jellyfish, won the coveted Camera d'Or prize at the Cannes Film Festival 2007.

Copies of Keret's latest work, Suddenly, A Knock on the Door, are available at the Bard bookstore.

For more information about Keret, and samples of his work see www.etgarkeret.com.

To read his columns for Tablet Magazine, see www.tabletmag.com/author/ekeret.

A selection of his stories is available athttp://reservesdirect.bard.edu/reservesViewer.php?reserve=87844


This event is made possible by the generous support of the Posen Foundation.

Sponsored by: Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7543  kuznitz@bard.edu

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Friday, April 12, 2013
Etgar Keret at Bard: Film Screening of Jellyfish
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:00 pm

Etgar Keret is one of the most popular and influential writers in Israel today. Keret's work has been published in twenty-two languages and adapted in over forty films. His directorial debut, Jellyfish, won the coveted Camera d'Or prize at the Cannes Film Festival 2007.

Copies of Keret's latest work, Suddenly, A Knock on the Door, are available at the Bard bookstore.

For more information about Keret, and samples of his work see www.etgarkeret.com.

To read his columns for Tablet Magazine, see www.tabletmag.com/author/ekeret.

A selection of his stories is available athttp://reservesdirect.bard.edu/reservesViewer.php?reserve=87844

This event is made possible by the generous support of the Posen Foundation.

Sponsored by: Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7543  kuznitz@bard.edu

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Screening of the Documentary Orchestra of Exiles
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:30 pm
There will be a screening of the 2012 documentary by Josh Aronson, Orchestra of Exiles as part of our Music in the Holocaust, Jewish Identity and Cosmopolitanism series. The series is made possible through the generosity of a grant from the Bertha Effron Fund of the Community Foundation of the Hudson Valley.
On Wednesday, March 20th at 7:30, there will be a screening of the Academy-Award- Nominated documentary “Orchestra of Exiles.” Featuring Leon Botstein, Itzhak Perlman, Zubin Mehta, Pinchas Zukerman, Joshua Bell and others, “Orchestra of Exiles” is the suspenseful chronicle of how one man helped save Europe’s premiere Jewish musicians from obliteration by the Nazis during WWII. Overcoming extraordinary obstacles, violinist Bronislaw Huberman moved these great musicians to Palestine and formed a symphony that would become the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. The film will be screened in the Weis Cinema of the Bertelsmann Campus Center and will be followed by a panel discussion.

Sponsored by: Bard College Conservatory of Music; Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Music Program
Bridget Hollenback  845-758-7878  bhollenb@bard.edu
  Thursday, March 7, 2013
Backward Wives or Agents of Revolution? Jews and Gender in Interwar Soviet Life
Olin 201  4:45 pm
Elissa Bemporad
Queens College, CUNYBy focusing on the ways in which one specific group of Jews negotiated between Communism and Jewish identity, Dr. Bemporad will discuss Jewish women’s distinctive path to Sovietization in the interwar period. A wide range of visions of both the Bolshevik experiment and Jewish women’s path to Sovietization influenced the gender discourse on the Jewish street and affected the shifting roles that women came to play in the political, cultural and social life of the Soviet system. Female empowerment, which would have been a natural outgrowth of the Soviets’ commitment to gender equality, eventually met and collided with male empowerment, as Jewish men began to view the “new Soviet Jewish woman” as a dangerous threat to their status, perhaps even more than their non-Jewish counterparts.Elissa Bemporad holds the Jerry and William Ungar Assistant Professorship in Eastern European Jewish History and the Holocaust at Queens College, City University of New York. She was trained at the University of Bologna and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. She received a PhD in history from Stanford University and is most recently the author of Becoming Soviet Jews: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk (forthcoming with Indiana University Press), which received the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History awarded by the Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide for an outstanding work of 20th century history.

Sponsored by: Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Russian/Eurasian Studies Program
Cecile Kuznitz  845-758-7543  kuznitz@bard.edu
  Saturday, February 23, 2013
Purim!
Study the book of Esther, eat pizza, and Hamantaschen, and celebrate Purim!
Kline, Faculty Dining Room  7:30 pm – 10:00 pm
Join us for intensive study of the biblical Book of Esther, plus food and much Purim levity. All are invited but please e-mail nelson@bard.edu to make a reservation by Friday, February 22 (so we can plan appropriate quantities of food). See you there!

Sponsored by: Chaplaincy; Jewish Studies Program
David Nelson  201-956-8228  nelson@bard.edu
  Saturday, February 23, 2013
Music in the Holocaust, Jewish Identity and Cosmopolitanism
Part One: Coercion, Collusion and Creativity: Music of the Terezin Ghetto & the Central European Experience
Olin Hall  7:00 pm
The Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College is presenting a special series of concerts titled, “Music in the Holocaust, Jewish Identity and Cosmopolitanism,” featuring music composed and performed by Jewish prisoners in Nazi territories during World War II. Three concerts will feature an introduction by a noted scholar in the field placing the music within the context of the larger social, historical and political background out of which it developed.

These events are made possible through the generosity of a grant from the Bertha Effron Fund of the Community Foundation of the Hudson Valley. The first concert in the series “Coercion, Collusion, and Creativity: Music of the Terezin Ghetto and the Central European Experience” takes place on Saturday, February 23, and will focus on music composed and performed in the Theresienstadt (Terezin) Ghetto, a ghetto/concentration transit camp that served as a showplace in which leading European-Jewish composers and performers were interned. Theresienstadt waspart of a vast Nazi propaganda ploy for international investigative bodies, such as the Red Cross, which provided the appearance of autonomy and privileged treatment of Jewish prisoners in the “model settlement.”  

The performance component of the evening will feature selections from the work of Victor Ullmann, Gideon Klein, and Ilse Weber, performed by  soprano Charlotte Dobbs with Renana Gutman, piano, and Liam Wood, guitar. Erwin Schulhoff’s violin sonata will be performed by Helena Baillie and Michael Bukhman. Leoš Janáček's piano sonata 1.x.1905 will be performed by Michael Bukhman.

The lecture by Amy Loewenhaar-Blauweiss will discuss the unique nature of the Theresienstadt Ghetto, the developments that led to the creation of a Jewish musical and cultural elite in interwar Central Europe, and the legacy of the music composed and produced in this ghetto.

Sponsored by: Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Music Program
Bridget Hollenback  bhollenb@bard.edu

Press Release: View